Author Archives: hay_editor

Curled Up With a Good Book review of A Student of Weather

Full of contrasts, light and dark, truth and deception, love and rejection, this elegiac novel is written in illuminating prose. The story unfolds through the eyes of the younger of two motherless sisters. Norma Joyce, a square peg who resists … Continue reading

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Collection of review excerpts for A Student of Weather

“There has never been a sister, lover, or daughter like Elizabeth Hay’s haunted Norma Joyce. A Student of Weather is as evocative as Jane Campion’s The Piano in its erotic obsessions and relentless quest for love and art. A sensual … Continue reading

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Pickle Me This review of Late Nights on Air

So often, unsurprisingly, we find ourselves employing metaphors of artistry when it comes to a well-crafted book. Writers “weave” narratives, “paint” images, and, yes “craft” at all. Similarly, I recently wrote about a book’s machinery. And all this is high … Continue reading

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The Bookbag review of Late Nights on Air

It was the beginning of June, the start of the long, golden summer of 1975 when northern light held that little radio station in the large palm of its hand. This isn’t quite the opening sentence of Late Nights on … Continue reading

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The Ottawa Citizen review of Late Nights on Air

Think of Elizabeth Hay as a gentle murderer. She knocks off a goodly number of main characters in her new novel, Late Nights on Air. But, in most cases, they have the decency to die off-camera, mysteriously and bloodlessly, despite unsettling hints of murder and abuse. The one death presented to us most vividly is a drowning, an event more sad and poetic than terrifying. Continue reading Continue reading

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The Georgia Straight review of Late Nights on Air

Much of Elizabeth Hay’s third novel takes place in Yellowknife or on the tundra beyond; harsh terrain and the chill of death are often present. Yet this is one warm story, thanks to characters so vital it’s as if they’re talking to us over java at the Strange Range café. Continue reading Continue reading

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The Washington Post review of Late Nights on Air

n the good old days, before we had to worry about the Internet killing off everything, we used to worry about the survival of radio. First television drove the industry into the music corner, and then corporate consolidation, rightwing cranks and shock jocks homogenized the dial to death. Let a thousand podcasts bloom, but they can’t replace the special intimacy we used to feel late at night in the car or at home—lonely or missing someone—listening to the silky voice of a sympathetic deejay holed up in a studio, talking into the dark. Continue reading Continue reading

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The Spectator review of Late Nights on Air

Late Nights on Air comes daubed with the usual eulogies, yet this is one book that truly merits the ecstatic blurb and more besides. It is Elizabeth Hay’s third novel, after A Student of Weather (2000) and Garbo Laughs (2003), both of which have been lauded in her native Canada and, to a lesser degree, beyond. Late Nights on Air is set largely in the mid-Seventies, in Yellowknife, the main town of Canada’s Northwest Territories. Harry Boyd, edging into his forties, has failed elsewhere, and has come to lick his wounds at the local radio station where his career began. He is joined there by a motley band of fugitives: honey-voiced Dido who fell in love with her father-in-law further south; clumsy ingénue Gwen, in retreat from an uninspiring home town; as well as some monosyllabic, disdainful veterans. Continue reading Continue reading

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Timothy Findley on Elizabeth Hay’s writing

Through Elizabeth Hay, a unique and provocative intensity is brought to bear…. She is exploring aspects of character not being explored by others, and the results are both wonderful and haunting. Her voice is one we have waited for—and here … Continue reading

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In Conversation: The New Quarterly interview

Elizabeth Hay in Conversation with The New Quarterly Magazine, originally published in spring 2009. The original item is published here with permission of the magazine. Elizabeth Hay – In Conversation With Hannah Albert I began this conversation with Elizabeth Hay … Continue reading

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